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#minaret

Omar Rajeh/ Maqamat | LBN

If you collect all the newspapers describing the horrors of Aleppo, you can build a tower. Its location: the south-facing corner of the Great Mosque in the Syrian city, which featured a minaret for over 1000 years. A pile of newspapers as a poor replica, for the holy column has lain in ruins since 2012. In #minaret, a show for six dancers, three musicians and a drone, the Lebanese choreographer Omar Rajeh circles a number of questions above our heads. Can cities die? Do their ideals, cultures and stories die with them? How do the survivors find their feet? Can they in a devastated city? #minaret is a show by Maqamat, the international dance company from Beirut, the trendy city that was just as ruined in 1982 as Aleppo is today. But #minaret is more than a dance show. Not just because of the video images and live soundscape inspired by Aleppo’s musical heritage. Omar Rajeh considers #minaret also an act of resistance to the increasing numbers applauding extremism, conservatism and fanaticism. In Syria and across the world.

On Tuesday 6 August, Wendy Lubberding will have a follow-up discussion with choreographer Omar Rajeh and his team after the performance of 8.30 pm in the Theatercafé in Theater aan de Parade. The makers tell about working on these performances and the audience has the opportunity to ask questions. In English.

Credits
Concept and choreo: Omar Rajeh
Dance: Antonia Kruschel, Charlie Prince, Mia Habis, Moonsuk Choi, Yamila Khodr, Omar Rajeh
Music: Joss Turnbull, Mahmoud Turkmani, Pablo Palacio, Ziad El Ahmadie
Coproduction: Romaeuropa Festival, BIPOD, HELLERAU – European Center for the Arts Dresden i.s.m. Tanzfabrik Berlin, Charleroi Danse- centre Chorégraphique de Wallonie-Bruxelles, Tanzmesse nrw en Advancing Performing Arts project

Danza Effebi: “The powerful dance of #minaret shakes the audience.”

Deutschlandfunk Kultur: “Omar Rajeh is the most famous choreographer from the Arab world. #minaret combines his strengths: powerful movements and a political connection.”


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